The Jewish People in Classical Antiquity

The Jewish People in Classical Antiquity Author : John Haralson Hayes
Release : 1998-01-01
Publisher : Westminster John Knox Press
ISBN : 9780664257279
File Size : 75.68 MB
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John Hayes and Sara Mandell provide a clear exposition of Jewish history from 333 BCE to 135 CE. This volume focuses on the Judean-Jerusalem community from a historical rather than ideological or theological perspective. With the inclusion of charts, maps, and ancient texts, the authors have constructed a fascinating account that is indispensable for the study of this crucial period.

Athens in Jerusalem

Athens in Jerusalem Author : Yaʻaḳov Shaviṭ
Release : 1997
Publisher : Littman Library of Jewish
ISBN :
File Size : 41.8 MB
Format : PDF
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Shavit (history of the Jewish people, Tel Aviv U.) describes how Jewish intellectuals of the 18th century began finding in classical Greek culture elements they though Jewish culture lacked and would have to embrace in order to become part of the modern world. He explains that by asserting that Judaism had been open to Hellenistic influences since the time of the Second Table, they legitimized their own efforts to secularize Jewish identity and culture. First published as Yahadut bi-re'i ha- Yavanut ve-hofa'at ha-Yehudi ha-Helenisti ha-moderni by Am Oved Published, Tel Aviv, in 1992. Distributed by ISBS. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

The Invention of Racism in Classical Antiquity

The Invention of Racism in Classical Antiquity Author : Benjamin Isaac
Release : 2004
Publisher : Princeton University Press
ISBN : 9780691125985
File Size : 68.21 MB
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There was racism in the ancient world, after all. This groundbreaking book refutes the common belief that the ancient Greeks and Romans harbored "ethnic and cultural," but not racial, prejudice. It does so by comprehensively tracing the intellectual origins of racism back to classical antiquity. Benjamin Isaac's systematic analysis of ancient social prejudices and stereotypes reveals that some of those represent prototypes of racism--or proto-racism--which in turn inspired the early modern authors who developed the more familiar racist ideas. He considers the literature from classical Greece to late antiquity in a quest for the various forms of the discriminatory stereotypes and social hatred that have played such an important role in recent history and continue to do so in modern society. Magisterial in scope and scholarship, and engagingly written, The Invention of Racism in Classical Antiquity further suggests that an understanding of ancient attitudes toward other peoples sheds light not only on Greco-Roman imperialism and the ideology of enslavement (and the concomitant integration or non-integration) of foreigners in those societies, but also on the disintegration of the Roman Empire and on more recent imperialism as well. The first part considers general themes in the history of discrimination; the second provides a detailed analysis of proto-racism and prejudices toward particular groups of foreigners in the Greco-Roman world. The last chapter concerns Jews in the ancient world, thus placing anti-Semitism in a broader context.

The Torah Ark in Renaissance Poland

The Torah Ark in Renaissance Poland Author : Ilia M. Rodov
Release : 2013-02-01
Publisher : BRILL
ISBN : 9004244409
File Size : 76.79 MB
Format : PDF
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The book explores the patronage, formation, and symbolism of the Renaissance Torah ark in Polish synagogues.

The Invention of Racism in Classical Antiquity

The Invention of Racism in Classical Antiquity Author : Benjamin Isaac
Release : 2013-10-31
Publisher : Princeton University Press
ISBN : 140084956X
File Size : 48.40 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
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There was racism in the ancient world, after all. This groundbreaking book refutes the common belief that the ancient Greeks and Romans harbored "ethnic and cultural," but not racial, prejudice. It does so by comprehensively tracing the intellectual origins of racism back to classical antiquity. Benjamin Isaac's systematic analysis of ancient social prejudices and stereotypes reveals that some of those represent prototypes of racism--or proto-racism--which in turn inspired the early modern authors who developed the more familiar racist ideas. He considers the literature from classical Greece to late antiquity in a quest for the various forms of the discriminatory stereotypes and social hatred that have played such an important role in recent history and continue to do so in modern society. Magisterial in scope and scholarship, and engagingly written, The Invention of Racism in Classical Antiquity further suggests that an understanding of ancient attitudes toward other peoples sheds light not only on Greco-Roman imperialism and the ideology of enslavement (and the concomitant integration or non-integration) of foreigners in those societies, but also on the disintegration of the Roman Empire and on more recent imperialism as well. The first part considers general themes in the history of discrimination; the second provides a detailed analysis of proto-racism and prejudices toward particular groups of foreigners in the Greco-Roman world. The last chapter concerns Jews in the ancient world, thus placing anti-Semitism in a broader context.

The Cumulative Book Index

The Cumulative Book Index Author :
Release : 1999
Publisher :
ISBN :
File Size : 37.16 MB
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The History of the Jewish People: The late Middle Ages

The History of the Jewish People: The late Middle Ages Author : Moses Avigdor Shulvass
Release : 1982
Publisher : Gateway Books
ISBN : 9780895265975
File Size : 35.64 MB
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Describes changes in the Jewish population in European and Arab countries during the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries, and looks at economic conditions, cultural developments, and religious life during the period

The Lord Wept

The Lord Wept Author : William K. Schultz
Release : 2006-07-18
Publisher : Xlibris Corporation
ISBN : 1469115824
File Size : 86.9 MB
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The Great Jewish Revolt Against Rome was a first-century tragedy whose effects still resonate today. Timeless themes that still plague the Middle East region and the world -- ethnic conflict, religious fanaticism, social upheaval, and the clash of civilizations -- made their baleful appearance in this bloody conflict fought from 66-73 CE. The Jews struggle against the Rome of Nero Caesar was part of the age-old battle of human kind to establish a society of justice and freedom in the face of the tyranny and exploitation of a great empire. It is also a story of the deeply fractured and corrupted Jewish nations bitter struggle with itself over issues of wealth and poverty, law and governance, collaboration or defiance, while seeking to order its society according to its unique laws and customs. An intense religious atmosphere infused the Jewish drive for freedom, and the deep religious ferment associated with their struggle had a profound influence on the subsequent development of both Judaism and Christianity. The trilogy The Lord Wept brings to life the swirling events of the Jewish nations attempt to free itself from the Roman Empire. Its characters are largely drawn from actual personages of the time, and the action adheres closely to historic events. The Disinherited Nation, the first novel of the trilogy, is set amidst the chaotic events of the year 66 when the revolt erupted. The action centers on a pair of nationalist Jerusalem aristocrats named Ananus and Eleazar who attempt to seize on what at first was an uprising against a corrupt and oppressive governor named Gessius Florus in order to establish an independent but conservative Jewish regime. Their endeavor is overwhelmed, however, by a bloody social upheaval that goes beyond their control in which the revolutionary leaders Simon ben Giora, Menahem ben Judas, and Eleazar ben Jair seek to create a radically new Jewish society. Amidst the turmoil the elderly scribal-scholar Jochanan ben Zacchai, who espouses the peace-loving teachings of his master the great Rabbi Hillel, tries to head off what he views as the Jews quixotic and ultimately suicidal drive for independence. He reluctantly starts to think the unthinkable -- what will happen if the revolt is crushed and the Jewish nation destroyed. The novel is furthermore the story of the Roman client and ally King Herod Agrippa II who, while carrying on an incestuous affair with his sister and co-ruler Berenike, attempts to restrain Roman brutality toward the Jews in sincere belief that the destiny of the Jewish nation lies in subservience to Caesar and to the Herodian family. He almost loses his kingdom and his life in the process. Featured also is the Roman general Cestius Gallus, the powerful governor of Syria, whose reluctant decision to crush the Jews leads to the mauling of his army and his own death. Drawn into the middle of these events are the early Christians, an unimportant sect reeling from the recent execution of its principle leaders and the vicious attack of Emperor Nero. While the Christians of Jerusalem -- who still view themselves as Jews -- agonize over the upheaval in which they are engulfed, a young Greek named Luke arrives in Judaea on a mission of scholarly research. His mission will plunge him into the middle of the violence of the revolt. It will also lead him to become romantically involved with the lovely Rachel, the daughter of his patron. The Disinherited Nation ends with an amazing Jewish victory over Rome and the attainment of a temporary independence for Israel. The subsequent novels of The Lord Wept trilogy, to be published shortly, will carry the story through to the revolts bloody denouement, the destruction of Jerusalem and its temple and the crushing of the last spark of Jewish resistance at the desert fortress of Masada

The Lord Wept

The Lord Wept Author : William K. Schultz
Release : 2007-08-16
Publisher : Xlibris Corporation
ISBN : 1469115832
File Size : 64.80 MB
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The Lord Wept: The Freedom of Zion The Great Jewish Revolt against Rome was a first-century tragedy whose effects still resonate today. Timeless themes that still plague the Middle East region and the world -- ethnic conflict, religious fanaticism, social upheaval, and the clash of civilizations -- made their baleful appearance in this bloody conflict fought from 66-73 CE. The Jews struggle against the Rome of Nero Caesar was part of the age-old battle of human kind to establish a society of justice and freedom in the face of the tyranny and exploitation of a great empire. It is also a story of the deeply fractured and corrupted Jewish nations bitter struggle with itself over issues of wealth and poverty, law and governance, and collaboration or defiance while seeking to order its society according to its unique laws and customs. An intense religious atmosphere infused the Jewish drive for freedom, and the deep religious ferment associated with their struggle had a profound influence on the subsequent development of both Judaism and Christianity. The trilogy The Lord Wept brings to life the swirling events of the Jewish nations attempt to free itself from the Roman Empire. Its characters are largely drawn from actual personages of the time, and the action adheres closely to historic events. The Disinherited Nation, the first novel of the trilogy (also available from Xlibris), is set amidst the chaotic events of the year 66 when the revolt erupted and the Jews attained a temporary freedom. The final two novels of the trilogy are here published as the twin parts of the novel The Freedom of Zion. The Star and the Scepter, the first part of that book, is set in the years 67 and 68 CE when a new Roman general Flavius Vespasianus conducts a brutal campaign of reconquest in Judaea. The shaky new government of free Israel, a conservative regime headed by High Priest Ananus, is unable to offer effective resistance and is itself overthrown by an uneasy coalition of Jewish revolutionaries including the Zealots led by the radical aristocrat, Eleazar ben Simon who attempt to impose far-reaching changes in Jewish society and governance. Another radical faction, the Tzadikim, is ensconced in the desert fortress of Masada. One of its leaders, Eleazar ben Jair, believing that the Lord has condemned the new Jewish state for its corruption, hopes to take his movement completely out of the war while his colleague Simon ben Giora nurses a vision of unremitting resistance to Rome. In the course of these events the respected old rabbi Jochanan ben Zacchai despairs that the new free Israel can ever fight off the Romans and begins to formulate a radically different Jewish society that will survive the inevitable destruction of Jerusalem and its temple. He eventually flees Jerusalem and establishes himself at Jabne, a town turned into a refugee camp by Vespasian. Meanwhile, the young priestly aristocrat Joseph ben Matthias has been sent to lead the resistance movement in Galilee. He is unable to stop Vespasians onslaught and is himself trapped and captured. Vespasian spares his life, however, intrigued by his prisoners amazing prophesy. Joseph declared that the Lord revealed that the Roman general was the star and the scepter of an ancient Jewish prophesy who is fated to rule the world. Joseph changes sides and becomes a sycophantic adherent of Vespasian and his son Titus. He begins to put together a grotesquely biased account of his experiences in the Jewish War, filled with absurd flattery of his new Roman patrons that even Titus does not take seriously. The Christian community of Jerusalem is plunged into increasing despair by deteriorating conditions in the city. Its members incessantly study the words of Jesus to seek guidance as to what they should do. They eventually decide to flee. Their guest, the Greek convert Luke, who is now married to the lovely Rachel, the youngest d

Elenchus of Biblica 1998

Elenchus of Biblica 1998 Author : Robert Althann
Release : 2002-12-31
Publisher : Gregorian Biblical BookShop
ISBN : 9788876536182
File Size : 30.27 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
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Diaspora

Diaspora Author : Erich S. Gruen
Release : 2009-07
Publisher : Harvard University Press
ISBN : 9780674037991
File Size : 34.47 MB
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What was life like for Jews settled throughout the Mediterranean world of Classical antiquity--and what place did Jewish communities have in the diverse civilization dominated by Greeks and Romans? In a probing account of the Jewish diaspora in the four centuries from Alexander the Great's conquest of the Near East to the Roman destruction of the Jewish Temple in 70 C.E., Erich Gruen reaches often surprising conclusions. By the first century of our era, Jews living abroad far outnumbered those living in Palestine and had done so for generations. Substantial Jewish communities were found throughout the Greek mainland and Aegean islands, Asia Minor, the Tigris-Euphrates valley, Egypt, and Italy. Focusing especially on Alexandria, Greek cities in Asia Minor, and Rome, Gruen explores the lives of these Jews: the obstacles they encountered, the institutions they established, and their strategies for adjustment. He also delves into Jewish writing in this period, teasing out how Jews in the diaspora saw themselves. There emerges a picture of a Jewish minority that was at home in Greco-Roman cities: subject to only sporadic harassment; its intellectuals immersed in Greco-Roman culture while refashioning it for their own purposes; exhibiting little sign of insecurity in an alien society; and demonstrating both a respect for the Holy Land and a commitment to the local community and Gentile government. Gruen's innovative analysis of the historical and literary record alters our understanding of the way this vibrant minority culture engaged with the dominant Classical civilization.

Readings in Late Antiquity

Readings in Late Antiquity Author : Michael Maas
Release : 2012-08-06
Publisher : Routledge
ISBN : 1136617035
File Size : 83.43 MB
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Late Antiquity (ca. 250-650) witnessed the transition from Classical Antiquity to the Middle Ages in the Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds. Christianity displaced polytheism over a wide area, offering new definitions of identity and community. The Roman Empire collapsed in Western Europe to be replaced by new "Germanic" kingdoms. In the East, Byzantium emerged, while the Persian Empire reached its apogee and collapsed. Arab armies carrying the banner of Islam reshaped the political map and brought the late antique era to a close. This sourcebook illustrates the dramatic political, social and religious transformations of Late Antiquity through the words of the men and women who experienced them. Drawing from Greek, Latin, Syriac, Hebrew, Coptic, Persian, Arabic and Armenian sources, the carefully chosen passages illuminate the lives of emperors, abbesses, aristocrats, slaves, children, barbarian chieftains, and saints . The Roman Empire is kept at the centre of the discussion, with chapters devoted to its government, cities, army, law, medicine, domestic life, philosophy, Christianity, polytheism, and Jews. Further chapters deal with the peoples who surrounded the Roman state: Persians, Huns, northern "Germanic" barbarians, and the followers of Islam. This revised and updated second edition provides an expanded view of Late Antiquity with a new chapter on domestic life, as well extra material throughout, including passages that appear for the first time in English translation. Readings in Late Antiquity is the only sourcebook that covers such a wide range of topics over the full breadth of the late antique period.

The New Testament

The New Testament Author : Edwin D. Freed
Release : 2000
Publisher : Wadsworth Publishing Company
ISBN :
File Size : 50.86 MB
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This introductory text encourages readers to take a close, objective look at the New Testament. Striking a balance between presentation and information for students new to this subject, the author prepares students to form their own analyses through his literary-critical approach and the insights he provides on the cultural and historical contexts of each passage. New scholarship and a variety of perspectives on controversial topics are also incorporated.

Introduction to the Bible

Introduction to the Bible Author :
Release : 1971-01-01
Publisher : Westminster John Knox Press
ISBN : 9780664248833
File Size : 72.69 MB
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This profusely illustrated book is doubly valuable! It introduces the reader to both the content of the Bible and to the life, faith, and history of ancient Israel, early Judasim, and early Christianity.

The Exposure of Infants Among Jews and Christians in Antiquity

The Exposure of Infants Among Jews and Christians in Antiquity Author : Erkki Koskenniemi
Release : 2009
Publisher : Sheffield Phoenix Press Limited
ISBN :
File Size : 42.47 MB
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This practice, so distasteful to the modern conscience, and shocking when we encounter it in reading about the ancient world, was nevertheless a normal feature of life in classical antiquity. There can be little doubt that both Jews and Christians, like their neighbours, practised the exposure of infants, whether for economic reasons, or because the child was of the wrong gender, or because of its illegitimacy. Otherwise, one can hardly explain the rich variety of arguments against the custom in rabbinic and patristic literature. In this novel and penetrating study, Koskenniemi reviews the evidence for the practice from Graeco-Roman, Jewish and Christian sources, and then, in the major part of the book, examines the rejection of the custom by Jewish authors like Philo and Josephus and by Christian writers such as Clement, Justin, Tertullian, Origen, Chrysostom and Augustine, many of whom adopted the arguments of their Jewish counterparts.

The Collected Critical Prose and Letters

The Collected Critical Prose and Letters Author : Osip Mandelʹshtam
Release : 1991
Publisher : Harvill Press
ISBN :
File Size : 20.21 MB
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"Osip Mandelstam was one of the major Russian poets of the twentieth century. His first works were published before the October Revolution and, after the Bolsheviks came to power, although his reputation was high, he was never fully in accord with the new literary establishment. He was arrested in 1934 after reciting a poem denouncing Stalin and began the harrowing journey to his death, recorded so movingly in his widow's memoirs Hope Against Hope and Hope Abandoned. Mandelstam, as well as being a poet, was a brilliant critic and prose-writer and this collection of autobiographical essays, reviews and personal reflections embodies many of the same themes as his poetry the nature of history, the continuity and yet fragility of cultural traditions, and the value of poetry itself. It is an essential volume for all admirers of Russian literature in general and the poetry of Mandelstam in particular.