Geostationary Weather Satellites

Geostationary Weather Satellites Author : Us Government Accountability Office
Release : 2013-08-12
Publisher : CreateSpace
ISBN : 9781492104551
File Size : 41.9 MB
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Since the 1960s, geostationary satellites have been used by the United States to provide meteorological data for weather observation, research, and forecasting. NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service is responsible for managing the civilian operational geostationary satellite system, called GOES. Geostationary satellites can maintain a constant view of the earth from a high orbit of about 22,300 miles in space.

Complete Guide to Weather Satellites

Complete Guide to Weather Satellites Author : U. S. Military
Release : 2018-01-11
Publisher :
ISBN : 9781976865930
File Size : 35.82 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
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This unique collection of government documents provides comprehensive coverage of all aspects of current and planned American weather satellites, with material from NOAA, NASA, and independent reviews of the troubled replacement program. Contents: Launch Delayed - NOAA Faces Key Decisions on Timing of Future Satellites * Improvements Needed in NOAA's Mitigation Strategies as It Prepares for Potential Satellite Coverage Gaps * Polar Weather Satellites - NOAA Needs To Prepare for Near-term Data Gaps * Geostationary Weather Satellites - Launch Date Nears, but Remaining Schedule Risks Need to be Addressed * History of the NOAA Satellite Program * NOAA Satellite Conference 2015 Summary Report * NOAA-N Satellite, POES Program * NOAA Response - A Review of NOAA's Satellite Program: A Way Forward * NOAA's GOES R - Next Generation Satellite * NOAA Knows...Earth-Observing Satellites * Options for Modernizing Military Weather Satellites * Bridging the Gap: America's Weather Satellites and Weather Forecasting The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) $10.9 billion Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R) program recently delayed the planned launch of the first satellite in the new series from March 2016 to October 2016. Based on its ongoing work, GAO found that the decision to delay the launch was due to poor schedule performance over the last few years (losing more than 10 days a month on average), recent technical issues with key components, and little schedule margin as the program entered integration testing. The October 2016 launch date may also be delayed if additional technical challenges arise or if schedule performance remains poor. NOAA recently changed assumptions about the expected lifespan of existing GOES satellites from 7 to 10 years based on the longevity of prior satellites. However, the analysis supporting this change is over 10 years old. Even with this extension, NOAA may fall short of its policy of having 2 operational satellites and 1 backup satellite in orbit. The agency faces an 11 month gap in backup coverage until GOES-R is operational, during which time there would be only 2 operational satellites. Any further delays in the GOES-R launch date could exacerbate that gap. NOAA is now facing important decisions on when to launch the remaining satellites in the GOES-R series to maximize satellite coverage while minimizing development and storage costs. Based on its ongoing work, GAO found that NOAA's $11.3 billion Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program is making progress toward the planned launch of the JPSS-1 satellite in March 2017. However, the program has experienced technical issues that have affected internal schedule deadlines, such as an issue with debris in an instrument's subsystem that delayed its delivery by approximately 8 months, and faces key risks in the remainder of development. NOAA is also facing the risk of a potential near-term gap in polar data prior to the launch of the JPSS-1 satellite. Similar to the decision on the GOES satellites, in April 2015, NOAA revised its assumptions about the expected life of the satellite that is currently in-orbit by adding up to 4 years, which would reduce the chance of a near-term gap. However, risks to the performance and health of the on-orbit satellite, and to development of the JPSS-2 satellite could increase the risk of a gap. Also, NOAA faces key decisions on timing the development and launch of the remaining JPSS satellites to ensure satellite continuity while balancing the possibility that satellites could last much longer than anticipated.

Geostationary and Polar-Orbiting Weather Satellites

Geostationary and Polar-Orbiting Weather Satellites Author : Judd Kamisch
Release : 2012-12-01
Publisher : Nova Science Pub Incorporated
ISBN : 9781622576494
File Size : 75.86 MB
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This book provides an overview of The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R(GOES-R) programs, which are meant to replace current operational satellites. Both are considered critical to the United States' ability to maintain the continuity of data required for weather forecasting. Since the 1960s, the United States has used both polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites to observe the earth and its land, oceans, atmosphere, and space environments. Polar-orbiting satellites constantly circle the earth in an almost north-south orbit, providing global coverage of conditions that affect the weather and climate. As the earth rotates beneath it, each polar-orbiting satellite views the entire earth's surface twice a day. In contrast, geostationary satellites maintain a fixed position relative to the earth from a high orbit of about 22,300 miles in space. Both types of satellites provide a valuable perspective of the environment and allow observations in areas that may be otherwise unreachable.

Geostationary Weather Satellites

Geostationary Weather Satellites Author : David A. Powner
Release : 2015-02-20
Publisher :
ISBN : 9781457866357
File Size : 40.30 MB
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The Nat. Oceanic and Atmospheric Admin. ( NOAA), with the aid of the Nat. Aeronautics and Space Admin. (NASA), is procuring the next generation of geostationary weather satellites. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R series (GOES-R) series is to replace the current series of satellites, which will likely begin to reach the end of their useful lives in 2015. This new series is critical to the U.S.' ability to maintain the continuity of satellite data required for weather forecasting through 2036. This report (1) assesses progress on program schedule, cost, and functionality; (2) assesses efforts to identify and address issues discovered during integration and testing; and (3) evaluates the likelihood of a gap in satellite coverage and actions to prevent or mitigate such a gap. Tables and figures. This is a print on demand report.

Geostationary Weather Satellites

Geostationary Weather Satellites Author : David A. Powner
Release : 2013-10-24
Publisher :
ISBN : 9781457849084
File Size : 78.23 MB
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The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with the aid of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), is procuring the next generation of geostationary weather satellites. The GOES-R series is to replace the current series of satellites (called GOES-13, -14, and -15), which will likely begin to reach the end of their useful lives in 2015. This new series is critical to the U.S.' ability to maintain the continuity of satellite data required for weather forecasting through 2036. This report (1) assessed GOES-R progress and efforts to address key cost and schedule risks; (2) evaluated efforts to manage changes in requirements and whether any significant changes have recently occurred; and (3) evaluated the adequacy of GOES-R contingency plans. Tables and figures. This is a print on demand report.

Geostationary Weather Satellites

Geostationary Weather Satellites Author : United States Government Accountability Office
Release : 2017-10-05
Publisher : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN : 9781977953070
File Size : 86.8 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
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NOAA, with the aid of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), is procuring the next generation of geostationary weather satellites. The GOES-R series is to replace the current series of satellites, which will likely begin to reach the end of their useful lives in 2015. This new series is considered critical to the United States' ability to maintain the continuity of satellite data required for weather forecasting through 2036. GAO was asked to evaluate GOES-R. GAO's objectives were to (1) assess progress on program schedule, cost, and functionality; (2) assess efforts to identify and address issues discovered during integration and testing; and (3) evaluate the likelihood of a gap in satellite coverage and actions to prevent or mitigate such a gap. To do so, GAO analyzed program and contractor data, earned value data information, and defect reports, compared both defect management policies and contingency plans to best practices by leading organizations, and interviewed officials at NOAA and NASA.

Digmetsat

Digmetsat Author : Markus Gwerder
Release : 2005
Publisher :
ISBN :
File Size : 25.6 MB
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Geostationary Weather Satellites

Geostationary Weather Satellites Author : United States Government Accountability Office
Release : 2018-01-08
Publisher : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN : 9781983607363
File Size : 47.62 MB
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GEOSTATIONARY WEATHER SATELLITES: Progress Made, but Weaknesses in Scheduling, Contingency Planning, and Communicating with Users Need to Be Addressed

Geostationary Weather Satellites

Geostationary Weather Satellites Author : United States Government Accountability Office
Release : 2013-01-22
Publisher :
ISBN : 9781482052176
File Size : 57.50 MB
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The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R series (GOES-R) program has made progress by completing its early design milestones and is nearing the end of the design phase for its spacecraft, instrument, and ground system components. While the program continues to make progress, recent technical problems with the instruments and spacecraft, as well as a significant modification to the ground project's development plan, have delayed the completion of key reviews and led to increased complexity for the development of GOES-R. The technical and programmatic challenges experienced by the flight and ground projects have led to a 19-month delay in completing the program's preliminary design review. Nevertheless, program officials report that its planned launch date of October 2015 for the first satellite has not changed. While the program reports that approximately $1.2 billion is currently in reserve to manage future delays and cost growth, significant portions of development remain for major components. As a result, the program may not be able to ensure that it has adequate resources to cover ongoing challenges as well as unexpected problems for the remaining development of all four satellites. The success in management of a large-scale program depends in part on having a reliable schedule that defines, among other things, when work activities and milestone events will occur, how long they will take, and how they are related to one another. To its credit, the program has adopted key scheduling best practices and has recognized certain scheduling weaknesses. It has also recently instituted initiatives to automate its integrated master schedule, correct integration problems among projects, and assess schedule confidence based on risk. However, unresolved schedule deficiencies remain in its integrated master schedule and the contractor schedules that support it, which have contributed to a re-plan of the schedule of the ground system and to the potential for delays to satellite launch dates. The program recently determined that the likelihood of the first satellite meeting its planned October 2015 launch date is 48 percent. Based on this planned launch date, the program reports that there is a 37 percent chance of a gap in the availability of two operational GOES-series satellites, which could result in the need for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to rely on older satellites that are not fully functional. Until its scheduling weaknesses are addressed, it will be more difficult for the program to know whether its planned remaining development is on schedule. NOAA has established policies and procedures that conform with recognized risk management best practices. For example, the program has documented a strategy for managing risks that includes important elements, such as relevant stakeholders and their responsibilities and the criteria for evaluating, categorizing, and prioritizing risks. However, while the program has a well- defined risk management process, it has not been fully implemented. For example, the program has not provided adequate or timely evaluations for potential risks, did not always provide adequate rationale for the decision to close a risk, and has at least two critical risks in need of additional attention. Until all defined risk management practices are diligently executed and critical risks adequately mitigated, the GOES-R program is at risk of exceeding cost and schedule targets, and launch dates could slip.

Geostationary weather satellites

Geostationary weather satellites Author :
Release : 2013
Publisher :
ISBN :
File Size : 30.21 MB
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Geostationary Weather Satellites

Geostationary Weather Satellites Author : U.s. Government Accountability Office
Release : 2017-08-03
Publisher : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN : 9781974189342
File Size : 81.49 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
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" NOAA, with the aid of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), is procuring the next generation of geostationary weather satellites. The GOES-R series is to replace the current series of satellites (called GOES-13, -14, and -15), which will likely begin to reach the end of their useful lives in 2015. This new series is considered critical to the United States' ability to maintain the continuity of satellite data required for weather forecasting through 2036. GAO was asked to evaluate GOES-R. GAO's objectives were to (1) assess GOES-R progress and efforts to address key cost and schedule risks; (2) evaluate efforts to manage changes in requirements and whether any significant changes have recently occurred; and (3) evaluate the adequacy of GOES-R contingency plans. To do so, GAO analyzed program and contractor data, compared GOES-R schedules, requirements changes, and contingency plans to best practices by leading organizations, and interviewed officials at NOAA, NASA, and at other federal agencies that rely on GOES. "

Weather Satellites

Weather Satellites Author : United States. General Accounting Office
Release : 1997
Publisher :
ISBN :
File Size : 42.37 MB
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The National Geographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is in the process of procuring new geostationary operational satellites to replace the current series of satellites, which will reach the end of their useful lives around 2002. NOAA plans to buy a continuation series of two to four satellites that will be very similar to the current series in their capabilities to fill the potential gap in satellite coverage that could occur after the turn of the century. Beyond the potential gap in coverage, NOAA has not yet decided whether to continue procuring the same type of satellites or consider new designs for a next generation system. In fiscal year 1998, NOAA plans to spend more than $240 million to develop and operate the geostationary operational environmental satellites system. Because the NOAA budget is expected to be tight in the coming years, this report assesses (1) the agency's strategy for procuring continuation series satellites, (2) what steps the agency should be taking now to prepare for the next generation series of satellites, and (3) whether the potential exists for improving the system and reducing costs in the long term.

Weather Satellites

Weather Satellites Author : Mark E. Gebicke
Release : 1991
Publisher :
ISBN :
File Size : 59.94 MB
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